Archives for nfd

NDN Project Monthly Newsletter for October 2015

The NDN project team compiles and publishes this newsletter monthly to inform the community about recent activities, technical news, meetings, publications, presentations, code releases, and upcoming events. You can find these newsletters posted on the Named Data Networking Project blog.

Community Outreach

  • PI Van Jacobson presented the keynote at the 2nd ACM Conference on Information-Centric Networking (ICN 2015). PI Jeff Burke sat on a panel that discussed ICN roadmaps for the next two years.  See the full program and papers for details.
  • For those who missed the NDN Community Meeting (NDNComm 2015) held last month at the University of California at Los Angeles campus, you can view most of the slides online. You can view the presentations on YouTube: Day 1 (Sept 28) Livestream and Day 2 (Sept 29) Livestream.We will publish a report summarizing the meeting soon.

Technical News

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NDN Project Monthly Newsletter for September 2015

The NDN project team compiles and publishes this newsletter monthly to inform the community about recent activities, technical news, meetings, publications, presentations, code releases, and upcoming events. You can find these newsletters posted on the Named Data Networking Project blog.

Community Outreach

  • NDNComm2015: This month we hosted over 100 people from 63 institutions and 13 countries at the NDN Community Meeting (NDNComm 2015) held at the University of California at Los Angeles campus in the Little Theater, Macgowan Hall, UCLA on 28-29 September 2015. They participated in presentations, breakout discussions, posters and panels. To view the presentations, view the archived live streams linked below. We will publish a report summarizing the meeting soon. You can view most of the presentation slides at http://www.caida.org/workshops/ndn/1509/.
  • Preceding NDNComm 2015, we held the first NDN Hackathon: 26-27 September 2015. 25 participants selected 7 projects out of 19 submissions. For a complete list of projects, and the winning project, please see http://ndncomm.github.io/

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NDN Project Monthly Newsletter for July 2015

The NDN project team compiles and publishes this newsletter monthly to inform the community about recent activities, technical news, meetings, publications, presentations, code releases, and upcoming events. You can find these newsletters posted on the Named Data Networking Project blog.

Community Outreach

  • Plans continue for the NDN Community Meeting (NDNcomm 2015) at the University of California at Los Angeles campus in the Little Theater, Macgowan Hall, UCLA on 28-29 September 2015. Registration is open on the website.
  • Hackathon: 26-27 September 2015. We are excited to announce the first NDN hackathon scheduled prior to the upcoming NDNcomm 2015. The organizers welcome participants across all experience levels and are reaching out to the community for project suggestions. If you have an idea for a project, please email ndncomm2015-hackathon@named-data.net
  • Project representatives will pitch their ideas to hackathon attendees and act as guides/mentors. We also plan projects suitable for NDN newcomers. Please stay tuned to http://www.caida.org/workshops/ndn/1509/#hackathon. We hope to see you in LA!

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NDN-NP Project 2014-2015 Annual Report

We recently published our annual report covering our activities from May 2014 through April 2015. We excerpt the executive summary here, for the entire report see http://named-data.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/ndn-ar2015.pdf:

The heart of the current Internet architecture is a simple, universal network layer (IP) which implements all the functionality necessary for global interconnectivity. This thin waist was the key enabler of the Internet’s explosive growth, but its design choice of naming communication endpoints is also the cause of many of today’s persistently unsolved problems. NDN retains the Internet’s hourglass architecture but evolves the thin waist to enable the creation of completely general distribution networks. The core element of this evolution is removing the restriction that packets can only name communication endpoints. As far as the network is concerned, the name in an NDN packet can name anything — an endpoint, a data chunk in a movie or a book, a command to turn on some lights, etc. This conceptually simple change allows NDN networks to use almost all of the Internet’s well-tested engineering properties to solve not only communication problems but also digital distribution and control problems.

Our first four years of NDN design and development efforts (which has a 4-month overlap with NDN-NP) tackled the challenge of turning this vision into an architectural framework capable of solving real problems. Our application-driven architecture development efforts force us to fill in architectural details, and most importantly, verify and shape the architectural direction. We translated our vision to a simple and elegant packet format design, a modular and extensible NDN forwarding daemon, and a set of libraries, including security support, to support application development. These achievements establish a platform that enabled us to tackle new application environments as we stated in the NDN-NP proposal: open mobile health applications, building automation and management systems, and multimedia applications. We achieved all our major milestones for the first year of the NDN-NP project. Highlights include:
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NDN Project Monthly Newsletter for May 2015

The NDN project team compiles and publishes this newsletter monthly to inform the community about recent activities, technical news, meetings, publications, presentations, code releases, and upcoming events. You can find these newsletters posted on the Named Data Networking Project blog.

Community Outreach

  • Save the date: We will host the NDN Community Meeting 2015 at the University of California at Los Angeles campus in the Little Theatre of McGowan Hall on 28-29 September 2015. We plan to hold a Hackathon on Sunday 27 September preceding the meeting.

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NDN Project Monthly Newsletter for March 2015

The NDN project team compiles and publishes this newsletter monthly to inform the community about recent activities, technical news, meetings, publications, presentations, code releases, and upcoming events. You can find these newsletters posted on the Named Data Networking Project blog.

Community Outreach

  • NDN-NP project PI, Lixia Zhang, and Postdoctoral Fellow, Alex Afanasyev, participated in the IETF Information-Centric Networking Research Group (ICNRG) Interim Meeting in Dallas, TX on 22 March. See below for details and a pointer to slides.

Technical News

NDN Publications, Presentations, and Technical Reports

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Get NFD Connected

The Named Data Networking (NDN) Project offers a potential future Internet architecture designed as a distribution network.

The last post described how to deploy the NDN Forwarding Daemon (NFD) on a low-end box. This post describes how to get it connected.

The procedures and experiences in this post apply to any NDN node. If you aren’t using a low-end box, you may follow the official guide to install binary packages or compile from source. This post assumes you have ndn-cxx, nfd, and ndn-tlv-ping installed. You need access to two machines with NFD running; referred to as “local” and “remote”.

Connect to Another Machine

After installing NFD on your machine, you can connect to any other machine running NFD. Although NDN can run natively above Ethernet, there isn’t a global scale native NDN network yet because NDN is still in its early stage. Instead, NDN can run as an overlay network on top of a traditional IP network. You can specify the IP address and port number of the remote NFD, so that NDN packets get encapsulated into UDP or TCP packets and sent to the remote NFD.

To establish a connection, enter the following command:
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NDN Project Monthly Newsletter for November 2014

The Named Data Networking (NDN) project team compiles and publishes this newletter monthly to inform the community about recent project activities, meetings, publications, code releases, and upcoming events. You can find these newsletters on the Named Data Networking Project website at http://named-data.net/category/newsletter/

1. Our recent annual report covers Named Data Net activities in 2013-14. The report summarizes highlights from our research spanning applications, routing, scalable forwarding, security and fundamental theory. It includes updates on forwarding daemon development and testbed deployment, and covers outreach activities such as education initiatives, our first NDN Community Workshop, the first ACM ICN conference, the NDN Consortium, and more. Please see http://named-data.net/project/annual-progress-summaries/2013-2014/ for the report in its entirety.

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How to Deploy the NDN Forwarding Daemon on a Low-End Box

Named Data Networking (NDN) is a potential future Internet architecture designed as a distribution network. To access the NDN network from a Linux or Apple OSX machine, one can install the NDN Platform, a collection of software packages including the protocol stack and critical applications. The NDN Forwarding Daemon (NFD), a core component of the architecture, serves as a software router and runs both on the network routers as well as on end hosts to communicate with routers.

The NDN team provides periodic releases of the new platform, and binary packages are provided with each platform release. However, the development of NDN software, including NFD, happens much faster than platform releases, so users can download source code from GitHub. If a user wants to run bleeding edge software, those packages must be built from source code.

As a geeky low end box user, I’m thinking: can I run the NDN platform on a Linux box with only a small amount of memory? The box I’m talking about is an OpenVZ container from LowEndSpirit UK location, with only 128MB memory and no swap space. To make the challenge more interesting, I want to avoid apt-get, and run the bleeding edge version built from source code.
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First public release of NDN Forwarding Daemon (NFD)

We are pleased to announce the initial public release (version 0.2.0) of the NDN Forwarding Daemon (NFD). NFD is a network forwarder that implements the Named Data Networking (NDN) protocol. More details about NFD, release notes, HOWTOs, a FAQ and other useful resources are available at NFD’s official webpage.

Also available is the NFD developer’s guide, which provides a detailed description of the implementation internals.

An important goal of NFD is to support the broader community to experiment with the NDN architecture. Thus, the current release emphasizes modularity and extensibility over performance to allow easy experimentation with new protocol features, algorithms, data structures and applications. We invite all interested parties to experiment with the existing code and submit their contributions to NFD Redmine or directly to Gerrit Code Review in terms of new architecture features and performance improvements.

More detailed information about the NFD release

The NFD Team.