Van Jacobson tech talk @ FISS

Van Jacobson tech talk @ FISS

NDN PI Van Jacobson discusses the philosophy behind content-centric and named data networking.
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NDN VIDEO FROM UCLA TO BEIJING

NDN VIDEO FROM UCLA TO BEIJING

A live performance at UCLA was streamed to Beijing in March 2013, using NDNVideo, in a test by WUSTL.
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THE NDN TESTBED IS GROWING

THE NDN TESTBED IS GROWING

The NDN research testbed is a shared resource created for research purposes, that now includes nodes in Asia.
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NDN AT INFOCOMM NOMEN 2013

NDN AT INFOCOMM NOMEN 2013

The NDN team presented two papers at NOMEN on authenticated actuation and Javascript support.
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NDN Project Monthly Newsletter for December 2014

The NDN project team compiles and publishes this newsletter monthly to inform the community about recent activities, technical news, meetings, publications, presentations, code releases, and upcoming events. You can find these newsletters posted on the Named Data Networking Project blog.

  • 1. The NDN Community Workshop report for NDNcomm 2014 will be available in January.
  • 2. This month we welcome Intel Corporation to the NDN NP Consortium. Eve Schooler whom we have enjoyed at several of our NDN meetings will act as point of contact for Intel.
  • 3. We plan to hold the next NDN Project Technical Retreat on 5-6 February 2015 at the University of California, San Diego. This retreat will host deep dive technical discussions with a focus on security solution development for specific environments: http://www.caida.org/workshops/ndn/1502/ (Ask Lixia if you wonder whether you should attend. The next NDNcomm meeting will be of more general interest and be held September 2015.)

Technical News

  • 1. The NDN Testbed has grown to 22 Nodes and 50 links. We have nodes in China, Japan, South Korea, France, Switzerland, Spain and the US. The most recent addition was Anyang University in South Korea.

    To see the latest information, check the status page. To see the bandwidth usage, see the Bandwidth Map.

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NDN Video FAQ – First posts

To complement the existing NDN FAQ, we have started the NDN Video FAQ with three initial postings.  The Video FAQ features on-camera answers to questions about NDN from faculty, students, staff, and industry colleagues.

NDN Project Monthly Newsletter for November 2014

The Named Data Networking (NDN) project team compiles and publishes this newletter monthly to inform the community about recent project activities, meetings, publications, code releases, and upcoming events. You can find these newsletters on the Named Data Networking Project website at http://named-data.net/category/newsletter/

1. Our recent annual report covers Named Data Net activities in 2013-14. The report summarizes highlights from our research spanning applications, routing, scalable forwarding, security and fundamental theory. It includes updates on forwarding daemon development and testbed deployment, and covers outreach activities such as education initiatives, our first NDN Community Workshop, the first ACM ICN conference, the NDN Consortium, and more. Please see http://named-data.net/project/annual-progress-summaries/2013-2014/ for the report in its entirety.

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Videos of NDN Tutorial at ACM ICN are available

The videos of the first part of the NDN tutorial at the recent ACM ICN Conference in Paris, France, are available here:

Tutorial #1 – https://vimeo.com/108870750

Tutorial #2 – https://vimeo.com/108870778

Manifest embedding

Manifests are proposed to be a special type of content in Named Data Networking that contains meta-information about other Data packets: a sequence of Data segments or completely independent information objects. While a great variety of useful meta-information exists, this document focuses on the case when manifest contains a list of Data packet names. For example, a manifest containing full names (prefix + digest of the packet) can be used by the consumer application for faster verification of data packets. Only the manifest object must be verified using the public key cryptography, whereas all other Data packets listed in the manifest can be verified by simple computation of the digest and comparison to the digest specified in already verified manifest. The purpose of this technical memo is to introduce the use of manifests for faster signing and verification of Data packets without requiring an additional round-trip delay for manifest fetching.

Read the full technical report on manifest embedding.

How to Deploy the NDN Forwarding Daemon on a Low-End Box

Named Data Networking (NDN) is a potential future Internet architecture designed as a distribution network. To access the NDN network from a Linux or Apple OSX machine, one can install the NDN Platform, a collection of software packages including the protocol stack and critical applications. The NDN Forwarding Daemon (NFD), a core component of the architecture, serves as a software router and runs both on the network routers as well as on end hosts to communicate with routers.

The NDN team provides periodic releases of the new platform, and binary packages are provided with each platform release. However, the development of NDN software, including NFD, happens much faster than platform releases, so users can download source code from GitHub. If a user wants to run bleeding edge software, those packages must be built from source code.

As a geeky low end box user, I’m thinking: can I run the NDN platform on a Linux box with only a small amount of memory? The box I’m talking about is an OpenVZ container from LowEndSpirit UK location, with only 128MB memory and no swap space. To make the challenge more interesting, I want to avoid apt-get, and run the bleeding edge version built from source code.
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Launch of NDN Consortium

The Named Data Networking Consortium was launched today to promote and sustain research in the NDN future internet architecture!  Please see below for more information or to join the consortium.

Press releases: UCLAWUSTL. Univ. of Memphis.

Consortium information, including members and membership details.

First public release of NDN Forwarding Daemon (NFD)

We are pleased to announce the initial public release (version 0.2.0) of the NDN Forwarding Daemon (NFD). NFD is a network forwarder that implements the Named Data Networking (NDN) protocol. More details about NFD, release notes, HOWTOs, a FAQ and other useful resources are available at NFD’s official webpage.

Also available is the NFD developer’s guide, which provides a detailed description of the implementation internals.

An important goal of NFD is to support the broader community to experiment with the NDN architecture. Thus, the current release emphasizes modularity and extensibility over performance to allow easy experimentation with new protocol features, algorithms, data structures and applications. We invite all interested parties to experiment with the existing code and submit their contributions to NFD Redmine or directly to Gerrit Code Review in terms of new architecture features and performance improvements.

More detailed information about the NFD release

The NFD Team.

NDNcomm 2014: 1st NDN community meeting

We are pleased to announce the first NDNcomm meeting, hosted by UCLA on September 4-5, 2014. This two-day meeting, the first in a series of meetings, will provide an opportunity to discuss existing capabilities and potential opportunities for the NDN software platform to serve the scientific research community.

Our goals for this meeting are (to be refined based on community input):

  1. elaborate on the current state of the NDN software platform and supporting libraries and applications
  2. describe state of current operational NDN testbed, and how to participate
  3. showcase external research using the NDN software platform and testbed
  4. debate existing and proposed functionality to support security and privacy at different layers of the architecture
  5. share examples of educational use of NDN, including tutorial material
  6. provide a forum to guide the evolution of the NDN architecture, key implementation artifacts including APIs, and to provide feedback proposing potential changes based on implementation and deployment experience
  7. discuss a vision/roadmap for the community interested in advancing NDN deployment and usability, and how to accelerate deployment, both from research and commercial perspectives
  8. provide an opportunity for interested members of the community to engage in hands-on-training to use NDN software or testbed platforms

If you think you are interested in participating, see the NDNcomm 2014 page for more details and registration.

Named Data Networking Next Phase (NDN-NP)

We are pleased to note that the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) just announced its support for the next phase of the Future Internet Architecture projects (“Moving towards a more robust, secure and agile Internet”). This next round of funding will allow the NDN-NP Project to further develop, test and deploy our novel Internet architecture.

Below is the project summary we submitted with our proposal on 7 June 2013:

Project Summary

Named Data Networking (NDN) is a Future Internet Architecture inspired by years of empirical research into network usage and a growing awareness of persistently unsolved problems of the current Internet (IP) architecture. Its central premise is that the Internet is primarily used as an information distribution network, a use that is not a good match for IP, and that the future Internet’s “thin waist” should be based on named data rather than numerically addressed hosts.


This project continues research on NDN started in 2010 under NSF’s FIA program. It applies the project team’s increasingly sophisticated understanding of NDN’s opportunities and challenges to two national priorities–Health IT and Cyberphysical Systems–to further the evolution of the architecture in the experimental, application-driven manner that proved successful in the first three years. In particular, our research agenda is organized to translate important results in architecture and security into library code that guides development for these environments and other key applications toward native NDN designs. It simultaneously continues fundamental research into the challenges of global scalability and broad opportunities for architectural innovation opened up by “simply” routing and forwarding data based on names.

Our research agenda includes: (1) Application design, exploring naming and application design patterns, support for rendezvous, discovery and bootstrapping, the role and design of in-network storage, and use of new data synchronization primitives; (2) Security and trustworthiness, providing basic building blocks of key management, trust management, and encryption-based access control for the new network, as well as anticipating and mitigating future security challenges faced in broad deployment; (3) Routing and forwarding strategy, developing and evaluating path-vector, link-state, and hyperbolic options for inter-domain routing, creating overall approaches to routing security and trust, as well as designing flexible forwarding and mobility support; (4) Scalable forwarding, aiming to support real-world deployment, evaluation and adoption via an operational, scalable forwarding platform; (5) Library and tool development, developing reference implementations for client APIs, trust and security, and new network primitives based on the team’s fundamental results, as well as supporting internal prototype development and external community efforts; (6) Social and economic impacts, considering the specific questions faced in our network environments as well as broader questions that arise in considering a “World on NDN.”

We choose Mobile Health and Enterprise Building Automation and Management Systems as specific instances of Health IT and Cyberphysical Systems to validate the architecture as well as drive new research. Domain experts for the former will be the Open mHealth team, a non-profit patient-centric ecosystem for mHealth, led by Deborah Estrin (Cornell) and Ida Sim (UCSF). For the latter, our experts will be UCLA Facilities Management, operators of the second largest Siemens building monitoring system on the West Coast. To guide our research on the security dimensions of these important environments and the NDN architecture more generally, we have convened a Security Advisory Council (NDN-SAC) to complement our own security and trust effort.

Intellectual Merit

The NDN architecture builds on lessons learned from the success of the IP architecture, preserving principles of the thin waist, hierarchical names, and the end-to-end principle. The design reflects a recognition of the major shift in the applications communication model: from the “where” (i.e., the host/location) to the “what” (i.e., the content). Architecting a communications infrastructure around this shift can radically simplify application designs to allow applications to communicate directly using the name of the content they desire and leave to the network to figure out how and where to retrieve it. NDN also recognizes that the biggest weakness in the current Internet architecture is lack of security, and incorporates a fundamental building block to improve security by requiring that all content be cryptographically signed.

Broader Impacts

The success of new architectures requires broad community involvement and uptake. NDN has built significant momentum through commitment to an open source model that has spurred substantial research activity in both architecture and current implementation. Project members are often invited to present at “future Internet” meetings around the world, and we have performed two high-visibility demos of NDN’s ability to handle large scale distribution. Industry is also showing increasing interest in NDN. Finally, NDN has also had a significant impact on our students, yielding several current Ph.D. theses on NDN topics, industry internships involving NDN research, and graduate and undergraduate curriculum material that offer a comprehensive alternative to IP to stimulate discussion of what network architecture design really means.